Summer Sweater Knitting

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photo used with permission of Laura Aylor

photo used with permission of Laura Aylor

Oops, how many sweaters can you start in a week? The answer is at least two. In addition to Foxtrot (the 4 Day KAL, see below), I cast on for Breezeway from Laura Aylor, in Trilogy Yarns BFL Sock base. (The pattern calls for fingering weight—so there are lots of choices, plus Nancy will be back sometime later in the fall.) The first time I saw the pattern I was struck by what a simply perfect t-shirt shape it is, and if I knit quickly, I could get a couple of months wear out of it yet this summer. Fingers crossed for speedy knitting!

 
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CURRENT CLASSES & EVENTS

4 Day KAL Work Party

July 12, 1:00pm-7:00pm | no charge

Participating in this year’s 4 Day KAL for the Foxtrot Cardigan? Stop in any time for support and company!

Cast On/Bind Off

July 27, 10:00am-2:00pm | Instructor: Sandy Buzzelli | $40 + materials

The look and fit of our knitted items is greatly influenced by the cast on and bind off methods we choose. If we need stretch for the cuff of a sock, we might choose one of several variations of the long tail cast on for cuff-down socks or the suspended bind off for toe-up socks. For a beautiful finish on a ribbed collar, we might choose the tubular cast on/bind off. If we are binding off after knitting garter stitch, we might use the sewn bind off.

We’ll explore these and many more ways to get stitches on and off our needles (crochet cast on and bind off, Emily Ocker’s cast on, 3-needle bind off, I-cord bind off), and we’ll come away with a general understanding of when and how to use each method.

As an added bonus, we’ll also discuss how to deal with two pesky issues that crop up when binding off: that loose last stitch when doing the traditional bind off and the jog that happens when binding off in circular knitting.

Prerequisite: you should know how to cast on, knit, purl, and bind off.

Felting By Hand [DATE CORRECTION]

August 3, 10:00am-1:00pm | Instructor: Sandy Buzzelli | $30 + materials

You’ll never run out of uses for this adorable little felted basket! It’s perfect for holding jewelry, keys, business cards or your favorite candy. Tucked near your knitting spot, it’s an especially pretty way to keep your knitting notions handy.

The basket knits up very quickly and easily, and felting it by hand gives it a classic, finished look.

You’ll be knitting your basket on your own before class meets so that we’ll be ready to jump right in to exploring in-depth how to felt by hand (vs. felting in a washing machine).

Please note: felting by hand is a mildly physical activity. It involves standing, bending over a sink, and lifting a large bowl of water. In addition, we’ll be swishing our knitted baskets in hot water for up to 30 minutes (with the opportunity to take short rests if needed). Please be sure you’re physically ready to felt by hand.

Prerequisite: you should know how to cast on, knit, purl and bind off.

Kumihimo Bracelet [DATE CORRECTION]

August 10, 10:00am-2:30pm | Instructor: Sandy Buzzelli | $40 + materials

As knitters and crocheters, we all have leftover bits of yarn in our stashes. Kumihimo, a Japanese form of braiding, can be a perfect way to use up some of those leftovers. In this class, you'll have the choice of making an 8-strand spiral bracelet or a 20-strand flower bracelet.

A kumihimo bracelet kit is available for purchase at Yarn Folk -- it contains all the supplies needed to make the kumihimo bracelet class project.

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...to anticipate

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We love Darjeeling ahd Chamomile (sparkly) fingering weight yarn from Earl Grey Fiber Arts so much! Prior to this order arriving, we were down to just a few skeins! Dyer Heather used three colors of Darjeeling to make the sweater featured below!

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...to inspire

photo used with permission of Earl Grey Fiber Co

photo used with permission of Earl Grey Fiber Co

Have you ever made a fandom-based project? Off the top of my head, I’ve knit a little intarsia Totoro, crocheted Hamilton and Jefferson amigurumi and knit two Hamilknits, used CustomFit to design an Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt sweater, and made adult and baby sized sweaters inspired by The Big Lebowski. There are probably more projects that aren’t leaping to mind.

Looking through other people’s projects, the (literal) thousands of Dr. Who scarves people have knit (and knit, and knit, and knit) stand out. (This is just the most popular iteration of the pattern—there are others.) This skirt, inspired by Jess, Zoey Deschanel’s character on New Girl is cute as all get out, and it has pockets! Engage is a shawl from Hilary Smith Callis that intentionally recalls the shape of a Star Trek communicator badge (and is perfect for a 150g cake of Apple Tree Knits Plush Fingering Gradients). And one of the most popular free sock patterns out there is the Harry Potter-inspired Hermione’s Everyday Socks.

Above, Heather Pleva is modeling her test knit of Maxim Cyr’s Once and Floral, based on character David Rose’s fashion choices on the Netflix comedy, Schitt’s Creek. What a great sweater!

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...to stitch

 
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Foxtrot

Here is the Olive Knits 2019 4 Day KAL sweater half way through my allotted four days! There’s another work day on July 12th, 1-7pm if you’d like to join in! Official KAL period is July 4-15, but make your knitting challenge fit *your* life!

As is my custom with top-down sweaters, I’m knitting the sleeves first. Using a highly variegated colorway means I need to pay attention to blending skeins, so here you can actually see bits of four different skeins! Skein one got me through the raglan increases to the sleeve divide, with enough to blend for several rows of the sleeves and the body. Skein two is currently attached to the sleeve in progress, and I’ll continue with it until just before the wrist ribbing, where it will be blended with skein three, which is just a bit darker and is used on the cuff of the completed sleeve. Skein four is attached to the body, ready for just a few more rows of blending as the lace chart develops. Later, it will transition to the remainder of skein three. Skein five is the most different of the five, and I plan to use it on the button band and neck edging.

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Ann